Sylvia’s Poetry

a blue-sky day

dried grass plumes
rise above a patch of cattails…

cattails whose heads
have long since blown open,
now fuzzy and disheveled,
nod in the breeze

naked tree branches
scratch and claw
at a bright blue sky…
anxiously waiting
to slip from winter bondage
and break into bud

signs have begun to appear..
portents of things to come…

the greening of grass…
nodding white snowdrops…
yellow winter aconite…

spidery witch hazel blooms…
yellowish orange
against a blue-sky day…

all harbingers of spring…
unnoticed by many
but treasures to the watchful eye

Sylvia L. Mattingly
March 4, 2021

Photo by Pixabay

MY GINGKO by Sylvia

my gingko

of origins that rise

from lands of jade

with fan-shaped leaves

so fittingly displayed

a crown of yellow foliage

fills my view

so strikingly 

against a sky so blue

then suddenly they fall 

without a sound

yellow leaves now drifting 

to the ground 

a skirt of gold 

now lying at my feet

a treasure where the 

earth and heaven meet

in nakedness your winter bones laid bare

your massive furrowed trunk

left standing there

a monument of centuries gone by

this living fossil rising to the sky

by Sylvia L. Mattingly

November 12, 2020

POEM

This Winter Day

Why can’t you decide?
First, you let a few white flakes float down
then you drop an anemic sprinkle on the ground.

I decide this cloudy day I can abide
then the sun peeks out from behind the trees.
Winter Day you are such a tease.

At least there is no ice on which to slide
but the Meteorologist says just wait a day
and you’ll need your sleigh.

by Sue Baugh Mattingly – January 26, 2019

First Snow

Poem by Sylvia Mattingly – January 10, 2016

a first kiss of snow

with a first kiss of snow on a january day 

perhaps winter at last has something to say

after patiently biding its time to alight

it has covered the earth with a blanket of white

 

it is not as though winter has come without warning

the animals sensed it on yesterday’s morning

with instinctual nature that leads them to know

when to gather and store for the coming of snow

 

as the whitetail deer hungrily forage on grass

the squirrels in my yard bury acorns en masse

and i watch them and learn from their God given ways

that teach me to ready for the hardest of days

 

now that winter has come in a vision of white

and has hung up its coat in the dark depths of night

we can rest in the peace that the snow comes with reason

and trust without doubt that we need this cold season

 

eventually the coldness of winter will wane

and the passing of time will ensure the spring rain

but for now we must live with a sky full of gray

and a first kiss of snow on a january day

 

“A snow day literally and figuratively falls from the sky, unbidden, and seems like a thing of wonder.” Susan Orlean

Snow

How do you feel about snow?

I love it! I especially like the fluffy kind that makes good snowballs and snow people. It has been a long time since I really enjoyed a good snowball fight, but I remember the fun when the snow packs nicely together in a ball that has the ability to frighten and sting just a little. 

1960s

One of my favorite home movies (remember those 35 mm cameras with the bright blinding light for indoor shots?) from the sixties is of an igloo built by my daughters, Raymond, and his two nieces. It was big enough for all four girls, Linda, Della, Dianne, and Allison to get inside. Winter back in those days always seemed to provide many days of that perfect snow for sledding, building forts and huge snowmen.

1980s

Once in the eighties when we were living in the country, we scandalized the neighborhood by building a very large and well-endowed snow woman at the end of our drive. She wore a halter and hat as I recall . . . but surely there was more attire. Why can I never find the photos from all those years ago? It isn’t like I don’t have them well organized in big binders stored all over the house. I can find photos among the 2,500 on my phone more easily.

Today

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Winter is a season of recovery and preparation. Paul Theroux

Although it was over seventy degrees here in KY two days ago, today we received a snow composed of the biggest flakes I’ve ever seen. While I want to say some of the flakes were as big as saucers they were not. Some were indeed as large as the rim of coffee cups, however! 

If you live in Chicago and certain areas in the Northeast U.S., I’m sure this subject is not appealing. I get it. I was hoping for an early spring here even though we’ve had a very easy winter, but there is something so mesmerizing about the falling snow that I had to take photos and sit watching it fall for an hour or so. 

Wherever you are I hope that your day is enjoyable whether here or on some other continent. 

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O, wind, if winter comes, can spring be far behind? Percy Bysshe Shelley