Distancing

Experts on the Coronavirus have warned that we need to remain six feet apart when we interact to prevent viral spread. This has been dubbed “Social Distancing” but I believe a better term would be “physical distancing.” We need to be socially close perhaps more than ever before.

Our social contacts may be by phone, texting or email. Maintaining the six feet of separation we can even be present together if neither has symptoms. I am so grateful to those who have reached out to me. Some just ask how I’m doing. Others are able to offer specific help like grocery shopping. Besides my immediate family, these are friends, neighbors, and relatives. One friend provides food, another dropped off pink azaleas! While I am in one of those high-risk groups health-wise I am also over the age of sixty (>70), but so are some of those checking in with me. It is not that I am in need or dependent. It is that people care.

Let’s all try to do better in remaining socially close during these unprecedented times.

8CC8BA28-C2DA-46EA-9F44-0F1BDAF04D4E

Kindness, Helpfulness and Support – ALWAYS ACCEPTABLE

 

 

Graphics by Pixabay
Advertisement

Personal Grief

We Will All Grieve

By adulthood, most people have experienced loss that triggers grief. If you have yet to lose a person or something that means the world to you, then you are probably very young and certainly very lucky. 

Facing loss of another or one’s own approaching death will bring on an overabundance of feelings. Some of these feelings we discussed earlier from Dr. Elizabeth Kubler-Ross’s book “On Death and Dying.” 

These feelings are especially likely to fall on the anniversary of a loss. It might be the actual date but it might also occur on the day of the week or a day that is similar in weather or season. Unexpected grief can be triggered by sounds, smells or sights such as a bird, a flag or a similar face. In these cases, grief comes even on a good day.

Holidays

The holiday season which we are facing now can be particularly painful following a loss.  While there is no single solution some ways that one can prepare or minister to self include the following:

  1. It is okay to say, “No” to invitations and to spend some time alone. Likewise, it is okay to join friends and family and to enjoy oneself even while grieving.
  2. Be honest with those who want to help you and let them know your needs. 
  3. Get enough rest, exercise and a well-balanced diet. Physical wellbeing is necessary for emotional strength. 
  4. Recognize that grief is not an obstacle but a necessary process. It is not an illness to be healed. 
  5. Consult your spiritual mentor or a professional counselor. 
  6. Prepare a way for your loved one to be memorialized such as a special candle or ornament in their honor.
  7. Take advantage of support groups such as those listed below. Often funeral homes offer such services, too.  

IMG_5745

Resources: 

GreifShare (church related) https://www.griefshare.org

Soaring Spirits International (for widowers) https://www.soaringspirits.org

Compassionate Friends (after the loss of a child) https://www.compassionatefriends.org

Hospice https://hospicefoundation.org/End-of-Life-Support-and-Resources/Grief-Support/Support-Groups

Pet Loss – Humane Society or http://www.petloss.com

“The flowers bloom, then wither . . . the stars shine and one day become extinct. .  This earth, the sun, the galaxies and even the big universe someday will be destroyed . . . Compared with that, the human life is only a blink, just a little time . . In that short time, the people are born, laugh, cry, fight, are injured, feel joy, sadness, hate someone, love someone. All in just a moment. And then, are embraced by the eternal sleep called death.”  Virgo Shaka (Saint Seya)

 

Theme photo in title by Pixabay