Sylvia’s Poetry

a blue-sky day

dried grass plumes
rise above a patch of cattails…

cattails whose heads
have long since blown open,
now fuzzy and disheveled,
nod in the breeze

naked tree branches
scratch and claw
at a bright blue sky…
anxiously waiting
to slip from winter bondage
and break into bud

signs have begun to appear..
portents of things to come…

the greening of grass…
nodding white snowdrops…
yellow winter aconite…

spidery witch hazel blooms…
yellowish orange
against a blue-sky day…

all harbingers of spring…
unnoticed by many
but treasures to the watchful eye

Sylvia L. Mattingly
March 4, 2021

Photo by Pixabay

Spring

Today I look at the flowering trees and think of you.

When we enjoyed them last spring we had no reason to think it would be our last dogwood season together. 

Now you lie in the cold ground with woods of redbud all around, but cannot see, or smell, or move to raise your eyes skyward. 

But, then I see an unexpected crane, a cardinal or a deer and I wonder if that is so. 

Sue Baugh Mattingly – April 15, 2015

 

 

Theme photo in title by Pixabay

Springtime Walk

Back to the Park

For various reasons, some more important than others, I have not been to the Parklands to walk for a long time. Mostly it’s just that during the winter months I’m a wimp about the cold temperatures and it seems that spring has been a long time coming here in Kentucky. Finally this past weekend the temperature was just right and I returned to Pope Lick Park, my favorite along Floyd’s Fork. Other areas of the Parklands are more elaborate and have very interesting features, but Pope Lick is more wild in places and more intimate, except for the soccer fields, but the walk around them illustrates kids and adults interacting in the most positive ways. Whether a team or family event, the atmosphere is competition at its best. 

The Walk

As I began my walk I eagerly looked forward to the signs of spring, but they were not as abundant as expected. Most trees had tiny tender leaves springing forth. There were signs of wildlife, but I saw only a few birds. I did document the extensive work of the resident woodpecker population.  The grass was mostly green, but there were dried grasses all along the trails. 

The further I ventured, the more interesting finds, including some of my favorites. There were cattails shedding like cats, mushrooms living well on dead trees and a sure sign of springtime, May apples. 

The 1.5 mile walk revealed very few wild flowers, or perhaps they are weeds, but they bloomed nevertheless. I wasn’t disappointed, but a little letdown that springtime was not waiting there for me as I had anticipated. 

The Encounter

Then I spotted a tree that was apparently very glad to see me!

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Snow

How do you feel about snow?

I love it! I especially like the fluffy kind that makes good snowballs and snow people. It has been a long time since I really enjoyed a good snowball fight, but I remember the fun when the snow packs nicely together in a ball that has the ability to frighten and sting just a little. 

1960s

One of my favorite home movies (remember those 35 mm cameras with the bright blinding light for indoor shots?) from the sixties is of an igloo built by my daughters, Raymond, and his two nieces. It was big enough for all four girls, Linda, Della, Dianne, and Allison to get inside. Winter back in those days always seemed to provide many days of that perfect snow for sledding, building forts and huge snowmen.

1980s

Once in the eighties when we were living in the country, we scandalized the neighborhood by building a very large and well-endowed snow woman at the end of our drive. She wore a halter and hat as I recall . . . but surely there was more attire. Why can I never find the photos from all those years ago? It isn’t like I don’t have them well organized in big binders stored all over the house. I can find photos among the 2,500 on my phone more easily.

Today

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Winter is a season of recovery and preparation. Paul Theroux

Although it was over seventy degrees here in KY two days ago, today we received a snow composed of the biggest flakes I’ve ever seen. While I want to say some of the flakes were as big as saucers they were not. Some were indeed as large as the rim of coffee cups, however! 

If you live in Chicago and certain areas in the Northeast U.S., I’m sure this subject is not appealing. I get it. I was hoping for an early spring here even though we’ve had a very easy winter, but there is something so mesmerizing about the falling snow that I had to take photos and sit watching it fall for an hour or so. 

Wherever you are I hope that your day is enjoyable whether here or on some other continent. 

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O, wind, if winter comes, can spring be far behind? Percy Bysshe Shelley