Guest Haiku

Several months ago  https://crookedcreek.live/2019/11/14/haiku/  we discussed Haiku and I asked readers to submit their original poems. A new reader, Jan Beekman, has done just that and here is her Haiku and her lovely photograph to go with it. The yellow blooms inspired her poetry.

Lilies drop petals

Long before other flowers

Best not to cut them

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Photo by Jan Beekman

 

Mother Nature Haiku

Mother Nature is
Always changing views for us
She is a giver

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Photo in Maui taken by Debbie Thomas Feb. 2020

 

“Seems you can’t outsmart Mother Nature.” Mark Hyman

Title photo by Pixabay

Haiku by Dogs?

Thank you to the readers who took the Haiku challenge! You did a superb job writing your Haiku and it was fun.

Imagine if your dog could talk to you. Or even better what if he/she could write Haiku like you? One reader pointed out the book below written by Jamie Coleman. I took a look on Amazon and found it intriguing. I think it would be a good holiday gift for any dog or Haiku lover! Here’s a sample from within the pages:

You may take my balls
But I will lick what remains
And then, dear, your face

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Sylvia’s Haiku

Sylvia Mattingly is my niece and friend. You know her from reading many of her poems on this blog. Syl jumped in with her Haiku which tells exactly who she is, a nature lover.

Sylvia’s Haiku

Lover of nature
I venture through the woodlands
And leave my heart there.

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Dianne’s Haiku

Thank you readers! The responses continue to the Haiku Challenge https://crookedcreek.live/2019/11/14/haiku/  The latest is about my Grand-dog, Hawkeye. Hawkeye’s name is bigger than he as you can see here.  The Haiku is by my daughter.

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Dianne’s Haiku

Tiny puppy dreams
Little feet run, he squeaks, snores
His dream squirrel is tiny too.

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Christine’s Haiku

A blogger I follow is Christine Goodnough. I recommend that you take a look at her beautiful blog “Christine’s Collection” https://christinegoodnough.com that often includes poetry. Christine was quick to respond to the Haiku Challenge https://crookedcreek.live/2019/11/14/haiku/ with a meaningful poem.

Christine’s Haiku

lighthouse
a steady glow in the darkness
your friendship

Christine went further and offered some advice and information that I want to share with you. Christine said:

The 5-7-5 rule is flexible. Some great haiku vary from this. There should be some sort of clear division of thought in the verse, and the last line is not to be just an explanation of the other two. For example, not:

I eat strawberry jam
on my toast every morning
I like strawberry jam

Christine has shared six more of her Haiku which are from her blog. They are listed below. Thank you Christine for sharing your expertise. It is always good to be learning something new!

More of Christine’s Haiku

beach party over
empty bottles settle
into the sand

beer cans
in the cave signs of
intelligent life

two females
two bird feeders — no question
of sharing

hummingbird
shares his syrup with a fly
noblesse oblige

wild prairie crocus
deep in its furry coat
a sunbeam

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Pat’s Haiku

Pat Bush is a faithful reader and frequent commenter on this blog. She was quick to answer the Haiku Challenge https://crookedcreek.live/2019/11/14/haiku/  with excellent poems. Here are Pat’s six Haiku.

Pat’s Haiku

The noise and the News.
I long for quieter times.
Silence is golden.

Feeling cold. I’m old.
Body aches and pains abound.
Better sore than dead.

I love challenges.
Especially ones with words.
The mind awakens.

Sue Baugh Mattingly.
Her blog is always nifty.
From it comes wisdom.

Cornucopia
What a wonderful concept!
A Horn of Plenty.

Eight whole notes; five, half.
Create all music we hear.
Amazing talent.

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Bill’s Haiku

More Reader Haiku

Bill is a friend who I didn’t even know was reading Crooked Creek, but he quickly took the Haiku Challenge https://crookedcreek.live/2019/11/14/haiku/  and here are his poems. I love them, Bill!

Bill’s Three Haiku

Star hanging as fruit
beneath the scimitar moon.
The tree boughs in praise!

Tried to write Haiku
But decided I could not.
Maybe I am wrong…

Ms. Sue Mattingly,
A wonderful friend I have.
She is a blessing!

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Kate’s Haiku

The responses to the Haiku Challenge https://crookedcreek.live/2019/11/14/haiku/   were many and I am so proud of each reader who has participated. You’ve done an impressive job and there’s some good poetry here. Instead of printing all the poems together I think they will be more appreciated if they are posted a few at a time.

I’m going to begin today with one by my granddaughter, Kate Elliott. Thank you, Kate, for your very meaningful submission.

Kate’s Haiku

I’m American
I live across the ocean
I love England too.

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I’m so happy to report that Kate is going to be crossing that ocean with her husband, Tom, in the next couple of days to visit us here in America!

My Haiku

Okay, I did it. At least I think that I did. Below is my final poem, but first I’ll share some of my initial attempts.

1. My love of nature
    has grown slowly year by year.
    Now it is so dear.
2. Haiku is silly.
    No fun in this poetry.
    Poetry should rhyme.
3. Here I sit with pen.
    I want to write a haiku.
   Oh no! What to do!

My Haiku

Crooked Creek was home
but not now, it looks foreign.
Gone so many years.

Your Turn

Remember, three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables. Send to: suebmattingly@gmail.com

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Haiku

Haiku

Do you know what a Haiku is? Do you know what Haiku are? Both questions are grammatically correct according to the dictionary. I checked with Grammarly which does not agree. What can we depend upon? It seems with Haiku there are as many questions as answers. Surely someone out there can help!

Poetry was not greatly appreciated where I went to high school. It seems a farming community had more important things to learn, like Home Economics and Agriculture. Reading a little Robert Frost is what I remember passing for poetry in my literature classes until college and then no one mentioned Haiku.

I didn’t hear about it/them until I was middle-aged and the local newspaper presented a Haiku contest. I read all the entries printed and mostly scratched my head. Recently I read a Haiku written by another blogger and appreciated it but still, I must admit that I didn’t “get it.” So let’s learn together. Are you game?

Definition

Haiku – a Japanese poem of seventeen syllables, in three lines of five, seven, and five, traditionally evoking images of the natural world.  (According to Merriam-Webster)

Haiku (plural haiku) is a very short form of Japanese poetry. Modern Japanese haiku are increasingly unlikely to follow the tradition of 17 on (sic) or to take nature as their subject, but the use of juxtaposition continues to be honored in both traditional and modern haiku. (Per Wikipedia)

Adding the word “juxtaposition” didn’t help me, how about you? But let’s keep learning.

More Information

How to Write a Haiku Poem by Stephanie Wong Ken  Updated: August 21, 2019

A haiku (俳句 high-koo) is a short three-line poem that uses sensory language to capture a feeling or image. Haiku poetry was originally developed by Japanese poets. They are often inspired by nature, a moment of beauty, or a poignant experience. To write a haiku, start by brainstorming ideas for the poem. Then, write the poem with strong details and detailed imagery. Make sure you polish the haiku and listen to how it sounds out loud so it is at its best.

Examples

  • An ocean voyage.
    As waves break over the bow,
    the sea welcomes me.
  • A winter blanket
    covers the Earth in repose
    but only a dream
  • The warmth on my skin.
    Fire falls beneath the trees.
    I see the sun set.

Are You Ready?

Let’s write Haiku! I will post mine first just to be fair. I have no idea what it will be like because I’ve never said anything in a few syllables, but I’m going to give it a go! Please work on yours and send it via email so that the lines and syllables will be clear as opposed to in the regular comment section. I will post each one with your name. Here is my email address: suebmattingly@gmail.com

Let’s go!

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