“The Call of the Wild”

Like most of you, I imagine, I read “The Call of the Wild” by Jack London years ago. I remembered the short book to be about a sweet dog who returned to the wild and lived happily ever after. This week, while riding the Beast, a.k.a. my Cardio Strider, I decided to listen to the audible version of the book. How could I have forgotten the cruel abuse this dog endured?

Buck was a one hundred and forty-pound St. Bernard and Scotch Collie mix who lived on a nice estate in California. A worker there stole the dog away from his owners who loved him and sold him to be used as a dog to pull sleighs in Alaska. Buck knew nothing about what was expected of him but he finally learned through many beatings by multiple owners. He eventually ended up in the Yukon area of Canada where the Klondike gold rush was taking place.

Again Buck learned cruel lessons from both the dogs he was forced to work with and from various men who owned him for a time. Finally, mercifully, he was rescued by John Thornton, an experienced frontiersman, who had a heart and a fierce love for Buck. They traveled the frozen country-side for a few years until Thornton was murdered by Native Americans. Buck was furious and savagely attacked the people until many of the Yeehat tribe were dead. Buck then followed his primordial instinct which had been calling him for some time, and he joined a wolf pack to live out his life in the wilderness and his wolf heritage.

The author, Jack London, published this animal fiction tale in 1903. He realistically gave this magnificent dog human traits and thoughts that were easy to accept as authentic. “The Call of the Wild” has been adapted into over one dozen films and remains an all-time favorite.

Talking to the Animals

If you could communicate with animals, what species would you like to talk with?

My Answer: Dogs and Cats

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I would want to know what they remember, if they can think of the future and whether they get their feelings hurt. I feel sure that they love deeply.

Your Answer?

 

“Children, old crones, peasants, and dogs ramble; cats and philosophers stick to their point.” H. P. Lovecraft

Photos by Pixabay

 

Haiku by Dogs?

Thank you to the readers who took the Haiku challenge! You did a superb job writing your Haiku and it was fun.

Imagine if your dog could talk to you. Or even better what if he/she could write Haiku like you? One reader pointed out the book below written by Jamie Coleman. I took a look on Amazon and found it intriguing. I think it would be a good holiday gift for any dog or Haiku lover! Here’s a sample from within the pages:

You may take my balls
But I will lick what remains
And then, dear, your face

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Staying Alive 1 of 6

Life Expectancy

Life expectancy is a tricky term. Statistics vary greatly in the way they are gathered and calculated, e.g., whether they include infant mortality and what country is being studied. As the chart below demonstrates women have a longer life expectancy than men, but we will not discuss the possible reasons for that here. Let’s just look at ways of “Staying Alive” for all of us. 

TIME

FEMALE

MALE

COMBINED

2012

78.7

1985

62

1900

30

Current

80.1

73.4

Born in 2018

81

76

Various sources including USA Today, Statistica and Wikipedia

Staying Alive

There is no lack of advice out there for ways to stay healthy and live a long life. Every person who hits 100 years has some type of answer for the secret to their longevity. Some say a glass of wine a day or perhaps a cigar or some other thing they enjoy.

Do you have “secrets” to a long, healthy, and happy life? If so, please share them with us. I can’t say that I do, so I’ll share what some of the experts tell us. We’ll just look at a few over the next several posts.

First: A Four-Legged Friend

Those of you who own a pet will probably attest to the fact that pets reduce anxiety. Research also shows they lower the owner’s blood pressure. For those of you who may doubt this advice let’s see what the American Heart Association says.

In the journal “Circulation” the AHA recommends owning a dog, in particular. As an owner of cats, I’m hurt, but I can see one big advantage to having a dog. Dogs must be walked so the owner is more active. But, the AHA goes even further and states that a person with a dog is more likely to survive a heart attack. 

Some of my doggie friends: Luke, Jackson, Hawkeye, Monty and Aslan

 

“My fashion philosophy is, if you’re not covered in dog hair, your life is empty.” Elayne Boosler

Theme graphic by Pixabay