Animals for Food

Before returning to the dark side, I was a vegetarian for ten years. From June 1993 to June 2003 I ate no kind of meat. It was harder in those days, especially when eating out, but I managed to explain to many servers that indeed fish and chicken were meat. It seemed they understood better if I explained that I ate nothing with a face. During those years I ate a lot of beans, rice, and pasta. I don’t know if I was healthier, but my conscience was certainly clearer.

Recently I ran across a list I made during that time. It is a list of ten reasons that I did not eat animals and I share it with you now.

  1. Animals have parents
  2. Animals love us
  3. Meat smells bad before it is cooked
  4. People who are allergic to animal hair have symptoms when eating sausage, think about it
  5. Animals experience violence, pain, and fear when they are slaughtered
  6. Animals have identity and personality; ever name your potatoes? talk to your peas?
  7. Meat is the only main dish with a gastrointestinal tract
  8. It’s like roadkill, just prepared differently
  9. I don’t care for blood and tissue in my mouth
  10. It isn’t necessary

I realize this list is partly disgusting, but so is eating meat when you give it serious thought. I also realize I am a hypocrite, because I do eat some meat now on occasion. I really do consider going “whole hog” vegetarian again and may in time.

 

“I think people should eat vegetarian food for 20 days and then see the glow on their faces.” Sangram Singh

 

Photos by Pixabay
Advertisement

CHANGE

Change Happens

Depending on our age we may have seen tremendous changes in our lifetime. I doubt that change is as evident to younger adults or that they have time to give it much consideration in their busy lives. As a retired person though, I have time to contemplate such trivial topics. This subject came to me yesterday as I walked past a soccer game and observed young parents dividing their attention between their kids playing on the field and the screens of their smartphones. I thought back many years to when I watched my children playing and while my mind may have wandered (ok, it did wander) I would not have been distracted by an electronic device as we are today. As I continued walking it dawned on me that because of these ubiquitous phones we no longer need to wear a watch, although we are likely to be wearing an activity tracker that includes the time along with our number of steps, miles, heart rate and other data. The same is true of alarm clocks, maps, calculators, newspapers, cameras and so much more made redundant by this one small gadget.

I might have first genuinely appreciated the changes that a lifetime can hold while talking to my stepfather when I was fifty or so and he was in his eighties. We were in the milking barn at his dairy farm and he was sitting comfortably in a leather recliner watching an automatic feeding system advance food to each cow patiently waiting in her stanchion. As the conveyor belt moved food and hay down the length of his modern barn I recalled my childhood seeing my father in his small barn where he did everything by hand including milking each cow twice a day. This was change, this was progress, but it still made me a little sad.

board-978179_1280

Is change Good?

Overall, change is good though, right? For the most part, I believe that it is, but we cannot deny that with progress has come loss. In my own lifetime, certain things come to mind that I wish I could experience again, for example not only being with Dad as he worked the farm, but wading in Crooked Creek with its sandy bottom and creepy crawfish, swinging with my cousin, Pat, on our grandparents front porch, riding my bike all over town with my best friend, Jeanie. Those years of innocence and discovery are the ones I miss most from my youth. I also miss the simplicity of my daughters’ childhoods growing up in a subdivision filled with other young families where they played outdoors with friends and each day held new experiences. We cannot go back, but I am grateful for memories of each phase of life. I may be through making scrapbooks, but I’m not through making memories even though they are peppered with jokes about age, lamenting the loss of height and trying to keep up with medical appointments.

I refuse to be intimidated by change, by technology or by the things that have been lost over time. Change may not always be welcome, but it is inevitable.

How about you? What are your thoughts about change? Again, more to come!

“The secret of change is to focus all of yor energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.”  Socrates

 

Part 1 of 4

 

Photos by Pixabay